Thursday, January 20, 2011

rhinocerebral mucormycosis





Mark Tatum was an American man from Kentucky, who became known as "the man without a face" after he became in 2000 the victim of a very aggressive facial fungal infection (Rhinocerebral Mucormycosis).

To save his life, doctors had to remove his eyes, nose, upper jaw and all surrounding bone and tissue which meant that he literally lost his face.

Tatum was a medical phenomena due to the fact that he survived the infection. Later he got a prosthetic face and he underwent surgeries so he could eat, drink and speak again.

http://www.documentingreality.com/forum/f149/mark-tatum-man-without-face-10348/

15 comments:

  1. you dare to post this because hes not your father.

    bitch

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    1. You can google this anywhere dumbass. This article was very informative. Thank you to the aurthor. You must be a redneck who has a small penis syndrom who hates on everything to compensate for your self esteem issues....

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  2. i posted it because its interesting and amazing that he survived and was able to be reconstructed.

    idiot.

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  3. Will not forget mucormycosis now... Studying for microbiology test.

    Mucormycosis can be caused by Mucor, Rhizopus, Rhizomucor, Absidia and Cunninghamella species. All are zygomycetes, which means they produce their spores in a ball-like structure called sporangium. Also, their hyphae (stick-like fungus structures) tend to share cytoplasm.

    Rhinocerebral mucormycosis means the fungus grows in the upper respiratory tract (nasal passages, sinuses etc.), invades the blood vessels, compromises blood flow and leads to death of tissue.
    A similar thing can happen if the spores are inhaled deaper, into the lung: thoracic mucormycosis.
    Also, wounds on the surface of the body may be infected.
    But the infection usually develops only in people with a compromised immune system, such as diabetes, immunodeficiencies, leukemia/lymphoma, severe burns...

    You can see the hyphae in clinical specimens (in these cases: stuff you cough out, blow through your nose, or surgically removed tissue). If you grow the fungus from the specimen in a lab, you can find the sporangium I mentioned earlier.

    Treatment is removing the fungus surgically, giving amphotericin B and making sure the reason for the original immune system compromitation is kept in check.

    :)

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  4. Thanks, I'm going to use your photo to show our Biochemistry scientists why being able to measure the amount of antifungal drug in the blood is really important.
    Infectious Diseases specialist,
    Sydney

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  5. The infection is very common who people who have lack of immune system, AIDS, cancer and diabetes mellitus.

    But healthy people can get the fungi Mucor, stay away from decay woods and clean yourself If you have long exposure into that environment.

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    Replies
    1. No it's NOT very common. In fact, it is rare.

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  6. I am so sorry for all this man has suffered and what his family must have gone through, but I am very grateful that it was posted as we have an extended family member who has diabetes and has this fungal infection. Seeing what this man has suffered and knowing he has survived and lives a full life now is a great comfort to us.

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  7. Thanks. I will show this photo in my medicine class.

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  8. Another medical student visit. Thanks for the post

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  10. Hey I recently got sent home from the dermatologist saying that the line in my forehead is a vein which is I assume correct. When I was young I got some kind of mark on my ankle area I swam alot in lakes always at cottages. That mark is still there till this day, and I horrible chest acne that my doctor gave me acne pills for which ultimately has left some scar tissue. I had an odd eye infection that while viewing the pictures of Mucormycosis looks similar. The line on my forehead could be a result of this infection clogging my vein... maybe since its dark but extremely hard to see in bright lights, but with a bit of a shadow you can see it on an angle. I also have some kind of growth at the bottom of the cartilage on my nostril. I am on this blog simply because I feel like I may be a healthy person who has been battling off this infection for a long time. If any medical examiner reads this and thinks that I do have some kind of infection that doctors have been misdiagnosing please reply I think the pictures can speak for themselves. I never did get a picture of my eye infection but the people my doctor sent me to that drained it took samples but never contacted me. I got a chest pic, nostril, forehead, and my ankle if someone has seen Mucormycosis before then maybe you could look and tell me if its similar.

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    1. I had horrible *

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    2. Mucormycosis is a rapidly progressing and life-threatening infection The mortality (death) rate is very high. I'm certain you do not have this infection because without highly potent IV antifungal medication within hours to days of developing symptoms, you would be dead.

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